Wednesday, November 05, 2008

If your man didn't win

I read two fantastic posts this morning. One is on my sweet friend Joanie's blog, and the other is on Randy Alcorn's blog. (He's an author and prolife activist--though I did meet him once, we're just not tight enough for me to call him my sweet friend. :) ) Anyway, I say "AMEN!" to the words these blessed Christians have written.

No matter what you think about the election, God promises to work all for the good of those who love him. While I may not have voted for Barack Obama, I am going to give him a fair shake come January. He'll be my president. Most of America wants him as our leader.

All of us who exercised our precious right to vote took a stand for something. At the outset of this election season I was ambivalent and didn't care too much one way or the other. (Some of this stemmed from the genuine sadness I felt when I realized that I just could not vote for the son of a man from Kenya, the first African American man in the race for the Presidency. As much as I longed to vote for these things, my convictions in other areas prevented me from doing so.) My views began evolving and I realized that if I really believe the things the Bible says, I need to take a stand for my convictions. I became more invested in the election and cast my vote.

Sometimes it's uncomfortable. We attended a Sarah Palin rally on Monday night. (Yes, really. I can feel my readership dropping...) I felt like we weren't the typical Colorado Palin supporters. (Not that we aspire to be!) Maybe it was the cheers that went up when Hank Williams Jr. accused Barack Obama of not liking the national anthem, or the demographic, or the way some people reacted when we said we were from Denver. I liked Palin's message about children with special needs and innocent children in our society, and about small government, but I felt like I didn't identify at ALL with the 3,000 or so other people there.

Bottom line though: even though my team lost, and even if I don't really fit in with Colorado Springs republicans :), I'm glad I took the stand that I did. And more importantly, I'll continue to do so. To stand for life--of the unborn, the poor, the lost, the rich, the Christian, the nonbeliever, the marginalized. And that means my actions--not just words. No matter who is in office, I can plead the case of the orphan and the widow, and seek to live out God's kingdom here on earth. And I will continue voting for people who I feel can best lead us in a virtuous way.

So today I'm wishing the Obama family the best, and am anxious to see how this most historic presidency will play out!

13 comments:

Rob Robertson said...

Well said!!

Hauswife said...

Right on!

joy said...

amen, sista! you said and i'm glad you said it so plainly.

erica said...

I liked your post and the way you are making an unfortunate situation, as positive as possible! I'm sure you realize though, that Obama is just as much WHITE as he is black. His ancestors are NOT African, they were Arab slave OWNERS. That's what kind of scares me...

America's obsession with him is kind of scary, as he has become an idol among Hollywood stars and young people. Don't get me wrong, i think it's very exciting to see a (part) black man become president! But again, he is just as much white as he is black! If Obama had gone around proclaiming himself to be white, people would be outraged. But it's suddenly okay that he and everyone else consider him an "African American." Just something to think about...

Keep on postin' :)

darci said...

amen, sister! :)

Mike and Rachel said...

I was going to do a post similar to this, but now I am thinking of just posting links to people much more eloquent than myself.

I cannot wait to hear more about the rally on Saturday. That would have been great to be a part of. I don't know why, but I really like Sarah Palin, and I think I would have been a bit star struck if I were there. I know, silly!

Brianna Heldt said...

Erica, I believe his dad was from Kenya, and his mother was from Kansas. While he did not receive my vote, I can certainly understand the hope, joy and significance that African Americans are finding in his election. I don't think the fact that he's biracial makes it any less momentous. Having two children from East Africa, I love that I can point to Obama and say, it can be done, we ARE the land of opportunity!

Brianna Heldt said...

Okay Rachel YES we must discuss! FINALLy a kindred spirit. I was totally starstruck. (Ask Kevin.)People will think I'm dumb but...I heart Sarah Palin. As much as I didn't care for the crowd, she was great. Maybe we can invite her and Todd over on Saturday too?

Joanie said...

Thanks for the shout out. I want to link to your beautiful words on standing up for life (and the marginalized - awesome), but alas, technology is once again ahead of me. But I will learn soon, and you'll be linked all over the place!

I heart Sarah Palin too. How could I not with how much she stands for keeping unborn life sacred? And she's chic. And just looks like America, standing there with her hubby, like "Here we are, Dear, can you believe it?"

Joanie said...

P.S. I can only begin to tell you how honored I am to be considered your sweet friend. I think you made my month with that one, Dear Friend.

I miss you!

nosmallfeat said...

This is one of the best post-election posts I have read. I kept my humorous b/c I didn't know how to not get political and get my point across about the struggle I felt (much like yours) and also to express the well-wishes I feel for Obama, and his family and for this country and all that ... and you did it. Thanks.

Robin said...

Great post! I came here from Randy Alcorn's blog - loved his post today also.

Mary said...

I am de-lurking to post a comment. Just read your thoughts (mine were very similar if you want to check them out :-) and I am thankful to find another adoptive mother who is on the same page.
A kindred spirit, for sure!
Thank you for being open, honest and gracious!
You've blessed my day greatly.

 

Blog Template by YummyLolly.com